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Apple testing Retina panels for iPad mini 2 - report

Apple testing Retina panels for iPad mini 2 - report

China Times says Apple has received samples of OGS Retina-class displays from Foxconn subsidiary SCST

Apple has begun testing new Retina panels for its upcoming iPad mini 2, according to new reports.

China Times claims that Apple will be adding a third panel supplier for its second-generation iPad mini, Foxconn subsidiary Shenzhen Century Science & Technology (SCST).

According to the report, Apple is considering using SCST's One Glass Solution (OGS) Retina-class display panels for its iPad mini 2, and has already been sent samples for testing. The report says that Apple will keep the 7.85in display size for the iPad mini 2, though. SEE: iPad mini release date, rumours and images

China Times also notes that DisplaySearch estimates that the iPad mini and iPad mini 2 will reach a total of 50 million units, topping Apple's full size iPad.

Apple's iPad mini was the first non-Retina iOS device from Apple since March 2011's iPad 2, so lots of people were disappointed when it was introduced in October. The full size iPad has had a Retina display for the two most recent generations, the iPhone has a Retina display, and Apple has even introduced the new MacBook Pro with Retina display, so a resolution boost is the natural progression for the iPad mini.

With rumours of a new biannual product cycle for Apple, the iPad mini 2 release date could be as soon as spring, and RBC Capital Markets analyst Doug Freedman has said that Apple's new iPad mini 2 is getting 'pulled in' by Apple, readying for Mass production. Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster has predicted that the iPad mini 2 could be released in March, alongside a new iRadio service.

SEE: Apple rumour round-up: iPhone 6, Apple Television, new MacBooks, iPad mini 2, iOS 7

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