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Rackspace focuses on Sydney datacentre and building support team

Rackspace focuses on Sydney datacentre and building support team

IT hosting company expects momentum for the Cloud to continue into next year

Partners dealing with Rackspace can look forward to an even bigger support team next year as the IT hosting company expects to double the number of staff by the second quater of 2013.

Rackspace A/NZ channel manager, Brendon McHugh, says this move follows a year of “phenomenal” growth for the company.

“Our team of local ‘Rackers’ grew from a handful of staff earlier in the year to a strong support team of 20 plus staff,” he said.

The launch of Rackspace’s Sydney datacentre in August means the company’s local technology portfolio will likely expand next year.

“I will work closely with our channel partners to make sure they maximise the opportunities that come with it,” McHugh said.

As for what tech trends Rackspace will be keeping an eye on next year, McHugh expects businesses to be looking to get more from their technology.

That means flexible solutions will remain in high demand, not to mention businesses will be asking for Cloud elasticity and big data analytics.

“Customers are starting to expect enterprise level support from the channel and the freedom to move easily between vendors, and channel players that are unable to provide that will be affected,” McHugh said.

As businesses begin to recognise the potential of the Cloud at the front end, all the while knowing that sensitive data is handled securely on private infrastructure, McHugh foresees the number of flexible hybrid solutions on the market to increase.

Having been impressed by the rate at which the Australian channel adapted to Cloud technology this year, McHugh expects the trend to continue into next year.

“In our case, business generated by our channel has increased from a small percentage to half our sales figures, and it will keep growing in 2013.”

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