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Kingston partners with ESET and ClevX

Kingston partners with ESET and ClevX

Partnership extends technologies to Kingston’s USB flash drives for enterprises

Memory products vendor, Kingston, has inked a partnership with security solutions developer, ESET, and IP/technology development and licensing company, ClevX.

According to Kingston, the partnership extends ESET proactive anti-malware technology and ClevX innovation to Kingston secure USB flash drives for enterprises – the DataTraveler 4000 (DT4000) and DataTraveler Vault − Privacy (DTVP) secure USB Flash drives.

Kingston said, in a statement, that the constantly evolving threat landscape and an expanding mobile workforce, spurred its partnership with the companies.

“Kingston aims to be a market leader in secure USB Flash drives for corporate and government applications, responding quickly to market requirements and constantly evolving threats,” Kingston Asia-Pacific flash memory sales director, Nathan Su, said.

ESET North America CEO, Andrew Lee said portable media is a common source of malware infection.

“People often carry sensitive personal files on their USB drives and they often don’t realise that their drive can be infected when plugged into a computer, and then that infection can be transferred to other machines,” he said.

He added that the partnership will provide corporate customers with additional robust intellectual property controls.

Corporate end users can immediately access ESET’s malware protection upon initialisation of the Kingston secure USB Flash drives with a strong password. Upon logging in and entering a password, the ESET engine scans for malware and notifies the user to take action if malware is detected. It also provides automatic hourly updates when an Internet connection is available.

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Tags memory productskingstonpartnershipsecurityUSBesetmalwareClevX

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