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ASG takes TPB to the Cloud

ASG takes TPB to the Cloud

TPB is one of the first government agencies to use an all Cloud-based solution

ASG Group has scored a contract with the Tax Practitioners Board (TPB) to supply an ‘all Cloud’ solution.

The solution involves a virtual desktop with all applications and data residing on a central virtual server. The data will also be accessible from any device remotely and securely.

The service will be provided across business locations in Canberra, Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane. ASG will manage the framework and maintain a managed ICT arrangement.

TPB secretary, Mark Maskell, said it was one of the first government agencies to use an all cloud-based solution.

“This will enable us to be more agile and efficient which will ultimately benefit the tax practitioners we regulate,” Maskell said. “This will allow the TPB to make strategic and tactical ICT decisions which meet our specific requirements, while being cost effective given the size and nature of the organisation.”

The Board regulates more than 53,000 tax and BAS agents and Maskell said an effective ICT system was essential to registering and regulating tax practitioners.

This change to the TPB’s ICT provider marks the start of a physical and logical separation of systems and services from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO).

ASG Group COO, Dean Langenbach, said more government agencies were embracing cloud technology as they recognised the value of scalable and flexible systems. “The responsiveness and security of our system will enable the TPB to spend more time on its core business needs and ultimately strengthen its end-user focus,” Langenbach said.

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