Organisations lack workplace mobile device management policies: Kaseya

Study finds IT managers allow 80 per cent of employees to use mobile devices in workplace

More than one in three (35 per cent) of Australian IT managers have no policies in place to manage their employees’ use of mobile devices when accessing corporate networks, according to IT systems management software vendor, Kaseya.

The statistics were presented in its recent 2012 mobile device management survey, which polled 214 Australian IT professionals.

The study reflected the lack of mobile device management policies, with 58 per cent of IT managers allowing more than 80 per cent of their employees to use mobile devices for business use in the workplace.

However, it indicated that security remains a key concern with the managers.

Respondents said security and compliance, remote email configuration and remote control were the top three features most highly sought in a mobile device management platform.

Seventy-eight per cent of respondents mentioned that information accessed from their mobile device was critical or fairly important to the business and that in the event of a mobile device being comprised, more than one in three cases would result in the involvement of senior management.

It also showed the greatest concerns for businesses are data loss and data leakage – 70 per cent cited these aspects as major issues.

“It points to the increasing prevalence of personal mobile devices in the workplace and employee desire to access information anywhere from any device. Employees are becoming increasingly mobile and critical business data is being dragged along with them,” Kaseya A/NZ managing director, Dermot McCann, said.

The survey identified a range of key business applications that employees access via their mobile devices. 97 per cent of them access their business email traffic, while 38 per cent have access to company CRM data.

Those IT managers surveyed stated they were in the process of taking measures to ensure that business data on mobile devices remains secure.

Fifty-three per cent said they are taking measures to store data centrally, 43 per cent installing a remote wipe option, 42 per cent regularly updating their security software, and 36 per cent refreshing passwords regularly.

Only 33 per cent claimed to conduct daily backups.

“It would appear that IT managers are now in a situation where they need to extend robust IT systems management controls and security policies to all mobile devices – not just laptops, but all mobile end points,” McCann said.

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