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Telstra now selling Galaxy Y for just $129

Telstra now selling Galaxy Y for just $129

Samsung Galaxy Y Android phone now available on Telstra pre-paid for just $129

The Samsung Galaxy Y: now available through Telstra for $129

The Samsung Galaxy Y: now available through Telstra for $129

In case you needed some more proof that Android really is the operating system for budget smartphones, Telstra has today announced the release of the $129 Samsung Galaxy Y Android phone.

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Exclusively sold through Telstra, the Galaxy Y has a basic features list that includes a 3in touchscreen, a 2-megapixel camera, and an MP3 player. The phone is just 11.4 mm thin and is available in coral pink or metallic grey colours.

Described by the company as a "baby Android" phone, the Samsung Galaxy Y is powered by the 2.3 Gingerbread Android OS. It provides full access to the Android Market for third party applications and it also comes pre-loaded with the Navigon GPS application. The latter provides full turn-by-turn navigation using the Galaxy Y's built-in GPS receiver.

The Galaxy Y also comes with Swype technology, an optional, on-screen keyboard that allows you to slide your fingers over the letters you want to type in a single motion.

Telstra says the Samsung Galaxy Y is Blue Tick rated, meaning it delivers superior mobile network coverage in regional and rural areas of Australia.

The Samsung Galaxy Y is available on Telstra's pre-paid Cap Encore offer. A $30 recharge gives you $250 worth of total credit for talk and text along with 400MB data to use within 30 days. The offers includes free calls and text messages to all Australian numbers from 6pm-6am until 23 April.

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