Menu
Apple to Samsung: Don’t make thin or rectangular tablets or smartphones

Apple to Samsung: Don’t make thin or rectangular tablets or smartphones

In a court document, Apple offers suggestions as to how Samsung's electronics could look less like Apple's

Apple proffers design advice on how Samsung could avoid stepping on Apple’s design patent toes, in a legal brief filed as part of its ongoing patent infringement lawsuit against its competitor.

Some of the alternative design options Apple has suggested for Samsung seem so farcical you’d think you were reading The Onion: Don’t make tablets or smartphones with overall rectangular shapes or rounded corners, make tablets with front surfaces that aren’t completely flat, try cluttering the appearance of the devices, and more.

When Apple sued Samsung in April, the company claimed Samsung had “slavishly” copied the distinctive designs of the iPhone and iPad, thereby violating Apple intellectual property rights. In its rebuttal, Samsung argues that there are only so many ways you could design devices like the Galaxy S and Galaxy Tab.

Apple obviously doesn’t think so. To defend its claim that Samsung had other design options, Apple had to provide examples of design alternatives.

The Design Alternatives

In section 2-40 and 2-41 of the redacted public legal brief, Apple offers alternative smartphone designs Samsung could have used instead:

  • Front surfaces that are not black or clear
  • Front surfaces that are not rectangular, not flat, and without rounded corners
  • Display screens that are more square than rectangular or not rectangular at all
  • Display screens that are not centered on the front surface of the phone and that have substantial lateral borders
  • Speaker openings that are not horizontal slots with rounded ends and that are not centered above the display screen
  • Front surfaces that contain substantial adornment
  • Phones without bezels at all or very different-looking bezels that are not thin, uniform, and with an inwardly sloping profile

The tablet alternatives Apple felt Samsung should have explored are similar:

  • Overall shapes that are not rectangular with four flat sides or that do not have four rounded corners
  • Front surfaces that are not completely flat or clear and that have substantial adornment
  • Thick frames rather than a thin rim around the front surface
  • Profiles that are not thin
  • A cluttered appearance

So, Samsung could’ve avoided this lawsuit altogether if it had a square (or perhaps triangular or round) smartphone and tablet instead, chosen a color other than black for the front, and/or designed thicker devices with a more cluttered look instead.

Two days ago, a US District Court judge denied Apple’s request to halt sales of the competing Samsung products (the Galaxy S 4G, Infuse 4G, Droid Charge, and Galaxy Tab 10.1). The infringement issue was too close to call, the court ruled, despite Apple’s claim in its brief that Samsung had "so many different design choices" it could have used instead.

[via The Verge and Hacker News]

Follow Us

Join the ARN newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags consumer electronicsintellectual propertysmartphoneshardware systemslegalPhonestabletstablet PCApplesamsung

Slideshows

IN PICTURES: Mitel A/NZ Channel event Sydney (+23 photos)

IN PICTURES: Mitel A/NZ Channel event Sydney (+23 photos)

Unified communications company, Mitel, invited its top 30 partners in A/NZ to the Intercontinental Hotel in Sydney’s Double Bay. This is the first time the broader A/NZ Mitel channel community have been together since the company re-branding back in October 2014, post Aastra acquisition. ARN received an invite to join attendees for drinks and canapés on the hotel rooftop as Mitel and its partners toasted their recent success.

IN PICTURES: Mitel A/NZ Channel event Sydney (+23 photos)
IN PICTURES: ARN Emerging Leaders Think Tank, Sydney (+40 photos)

IN PICTURES: ARN Emerging Leaders Think Tank, Sydney (+40 photos)

Twenty-one industry leaders came together with ARN staff for an Emerging Leaders Think Tank, held at The Bottle Shop in Sydney​. The aim of the planning session was to develop a compelling program for high potential leaders in the Australian ICT industry.​ Over two hours of strong debate a core line of thought evolved which will form the basis of the Emerging Leaders Forum to be held on May 17 in Sydney. Photos by MARIA STEFINA.

IN PICTURES: ARN Emerging Leaders Think Tank, Sydney (+40 photos)

iasset.com is a channel management ecosystem that automates all major aspects of the entire sales, marketing and service process, including data tracking, integrated learning, knowledge management and product lifecycle management.

Show Comments