Many price plans cheaper on NBN than ADSL 2+: Analysis

Comparison website, WhistleOut claims collective underlying prices for many NBN plans are cheaper on a per gigabyte usage basis than existing ADSL2+

Customers will be paying less for plans on the National Broadband Network (NBN) than existing ADSL 2+ and line rental plans, according to an analysis conducted by comparison site WhistleOut.

The company conducted a price analysis of the four Internet service providers that have announced NBN consumer pricing including iiNet, Internode, Exetel and iPrimus.

The results showed that the collective underlying prices for many NBN plans are cheaper, on a per gigabyte usage basis, compared to existing monthly ADSL 2+ and phone line rental plans.

“On the NBN's entry level speeds (12Mpbs and 25Mbps) we found consumers will actually be paying less than today's ADSL 2+ and line rental plans for the equivalent usage, with savings of 23 per cent to 43 per cent on the entry level speeds (12Mbps)," WhistleOut director Cameron Craig, said.

He stated that with speed options getting faster on the NBN, consumer plans do get more expensive than the current ADSL2+ prices, with the highest surge being a total increase of 66 per cent across the four providers when comparing top NBN speeds of 100Mbps and mid-tier data usage.

The analysis further showed that on the largest usage quota ADSL 2+ plan of 1000GB, it takes more than nine days to download the quota, as compared to a little more than seven hours on the NBN’s highest possible speed of 100Mbps.

“While 10 per cent of Australians already have access to high speeds via cable internet in metro cities, 90 per cent of Australians are on speeds from dial up to ADSL2+ with no guarantee of the actual speed they’ll get. Around 569,000 Australians are still on dial-up internet access," Craig added.

Telstra and Optus are yet to announce their consumer pricing for the NBN, but have passed NBN Co’s certification process to examine services and have signed landmark contracts with NBN to share infrastructure.

The network is expected to be completed by 2020 and is currently being rolled out in states across Australia under the Regional Backbone Blackspots program and in Tasmania.

Tags iprimusExetelinternodeNational Broadband Network (NBN)adsl2iiNetoptusWhistleOutTelstra

More about BackboneetworkIinetInternodeiPrimusOptusPrimus AustraliaTelstra Corporation

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1 Comment

John

1

I will be worse off with the NBN, iinet for $60 only give 20Gb then slow you down to dial up speed and we all know that it's unusable then, 20Gb would last me 2.5 days

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