IN PICTURES: Panasonic shows off its sustainability vision, and other toys

Journalists invited to take photos of the carbon-neutral "eco-house"

The giant battery that stores unused power collected from the solar panels for future use.

The giant battery that stores unused power collected from the solar panels for future use.

Panasonic’s vision for an entertaining and sustainable future was revealed when it led a group of journalists on a tour of its four-floor showcase facility in Tokyo, Japan.

We weren’t able to take photos of everything - some of the technology was quite forward thinking - but what was there was very interesting indeed. From the 152-inch ultra HD 3D screen that will replace cinemas for most people to big advancements in the development of electric cars, Panasonic has its fingers in many pies.

Most impressive, though, was the tour through the zero carbon household that Panasonic has designed to show off to visitors.

It didn’t skimp on the luxuries we wouldn’t give up for the sake of sustainability; the powerful air conditioning provided relief from the stiflingly hot and humid Japanese weather, and there was plenty of technology powered on.

What the building did do was utilise Sanyo (which Panasonic recently acquired) solar panels and Panasonic battery technology to provide and store power to the house, and then manage the lighting through some smart power software that Panasonic has devised.

The vendor has the goal to be the most ecologically-friendly consumer electronics provider by 2018, and so it’s aggressively promoting the benefits of its technology to the market.

It doesn’t always gel together, though; the 152-inch TV was not on display in the eco-home, for instance.

Other products on show included 3D video recorders and TVs; Panasonic seems as committed as Sony to turning 3D into a mass market product. There were also Lumix cameras that just happen to double as phones.

Interestingly there was a big display for Nintendo on the showroom too. Why it was there, I (and the Panasonic staff) had no idea. I’m halfway tempted to start acquisition rumours, but the companies have historically had close ties, and Panasonic has no gaming technology of its own.

It was an interesting look into the mind of a Japanese giant that is fair to say is under-represented in the Australian market. Here’s hoping the sustainability message takes off for it.

Matthew Sainsbury toured Panasonic's Japanese facilities as a guest of Panasonic

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