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Updated: RSA searches for new country manager after Pullen departure

Updated: RSA searches for new country manager after Pullen departure

Mark Pullen leaves after 10 years with the security vendor

Security vendor, RSA, is searching for a new country manager after the departure of Mark Pullen.

He leaves the vendor after almost 10 years with the company for a new role with Check Point Software Technologies as its client executive for strategic accounts.

In a statement, RSA said Pullen left for personal reasons.

RSA channel and alliances general manager, Phil Teague, confirmed Pullen departed a few weeks ago.

In the meantime, the security vendor’s Asia-Pacific vice-president, Vincent Goh, will assume Pullen’s responsibilities until a replacement is found.

“RSA is actively seeking a replacement and hopes to make a further announcement about this soon,” RSA said in a statement.

Pullen said he was attracted to a new challenge and the opportunity to join Check Point in a senior role.

"Check Point provides me with the chance to work with some of the best security experts in the world and maintain a strategic focus on the industry I have been a part of for the past 15 years," Pullen said. "I’ll be focused on helping our partners meet the challenge of securing the virtual enterprise and infrastructure for their banking and finance customers as their next-generation banking platforms take shape.” Check Point regional director A/NZ, Scott McKinnel, said Pullen had the skills to engage customers at a strategic level and guide them on complex security projects.

“I’m delighted to appoint someone of Mark’s experience and expertise into this key, senior management role which is part of an ongoing commitment to our banking and finance customers," McKinnel said. Pullen began working with RSA in 2001 and prior to that, he was the sales director of VeriSign for two years.

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