Social media takes to the streets

SoMo revolutionises online social media and social networking

Welcome to the era of SoMo.

Sure, online social media and social networking are popular, but they don’t mimic the way we naturally interact. Why use Facebook or Twitter to tell friends what you are doing at the moment, when you can directly show them what you are doing and where you are doing it?

This is where SoMo, or social mobile media, comes in.

The SoMo experience begins with tools like GPS that can identify where we are and where we are going in real time. GPS is further enhanced through the marking of actual physical locations – geotagging. Geotagging can include everything from “soundprints” to video markers, and the tagging of locally relevant reviews and news. GeoGraffiti, for example, allows mobile phone users to record a message tied to a specific place that is later retrievable by anyone who finds themselves near the same location. Geotaggers can leave a virtual “Kilgore was here” tag at any place, freezing in time and making publicly available their location-specific activities, interactions and thoughts.

Mobile social networking is also coming on strong with applications like Foursquare and Britekite. Mobile phone users can discover each other, both friends and strangers, via profiles they make available at a particular location.

Not surprisingly, mobile social advertising is at the vanguard of SoMo developments. Localised applications allow businesses to advertise their goods or specials through alerts that are wirelessly beamed to consumers as they approach a store or restaurant. Consumers can opt out of such alerts, turn them off or ignore them. Privacy is still an issue, but as advertising and search continue to go local, we will see much more of this type of virtual hawking.

How we experience the real world will increasingly be augmented and enhanced through the screen of a mobile phone. New services like Layar are turning camera phones into digital browser search tools that layer useful information on top of real-time images. A picture of a street corner, for example, could reveal ratings and suggestions from locals on where to find an ATM machine or a good cup of coffee nearby.

Community and social service organisations will also start jumping onto the mobile bandwagon. Imagine walking by a library and having the ability to reserve a book, or signing up for a class at a local community centre after receiving an alert when you drive by.

Some innovators are experimenting with the aggregation of movements in urban areas to identify hot spots of activity. Others are tracking and sharing up-to-the-moment reports on air quality and weather conditions via sensors built into mobile devices.

Finally, as next-generation sensor networks are built out using RFID chips and bar coding, devices will be able to talk directly to each other or to conveniently locate information for us on the spot. The ability to read barcodes with phones in a store, enabling price comparisons at the point of purchase, is an example.

Tags social networkingsocial media

More about Facebook

Comments

Comments are now closed

 

Latest News

Nov 21
Tech Mahindra acquires Lightbridge Communications for US$240 million
Nov 21
Data#3 predicts "solid" growth in first half
Nov 21
Spanning partners with Fronde
Nov 21
Simon Hackett joins Redflow
More News
25 Nov
GovInnovate Summit
03 Dec
DC Infrastructure Solutions Professional
04 Dec
DC Infrastructure Delivery Professional
16 Dec
DC Infrastructure Solutions Professional
View all events