Menu
Cisco CEO sees videoconferencing on planes within 18 months

Cisco CEO sees videoconferencing on planes within 18 months

The arrival of Wi-Fi services and other types of Internet connections on planes will enable travelers to hook up devices to the Web.

In-flight Internet access may also enable videoconferencing on board airplanes, effectively closing off one of the last refuges from meetings for business travelers. At least, that's what Cisco Systems CEO John Chambers predicted at Symposium/ITxpo 2008 Wednesday.

During a keynote question-and-answer session at the Gartner conference, Chambers continued to make the argument that videoconferencing can significantly reduce corporate travel. He claimed that Cisco has cut its own travel by 30 percent, thereby saving about US$150 million, through the use of its TelePresence technology -- one of a new breed of high-definition videoconferencing systems from various vendors.

"I want to be on a plane and have TelePresence in front of me," quipped Thomas Bittman, one of the Gartner analysts who interviewed Chambers onstage here.

"Well, the answer is, you are probably going to," said Chambers, who predicted that the arrival of Wi-Fi services and other types of Internet connections on planes will enable travelers to hook up devices to the Web -- potentially moving in-flight Internet access well beyond mere entertainment options. Chambers said he sees such capabilities becoming available within 18 months or so.

Chambers also bucked the economic gloom and doom by saying that he plans to expand Cisco's IT spending during 2009. "We are going to grow our expenses in IT, regardless of what the economy does, by 10 percent next year," he said.

If other companies follow Cisco's lead on spending, it likely would be a good thing for the networking vendor's bottom line. But Chambers advised IT managers that budget cuts are likely at companies where IT is primarily viewed as an expense. At businesses where technology is seen as "the enabler of business strategy," he said, economic slowdowns can be used to "gain huge competitive advantage."

For instance, a CIO can make an argument for increasing IT spending if he tells his company's CEO that doing so could help grow business activity by 5 to 10 percent or "dramatically reduce the risk" involved in combining two companies that are being merged, Chambers said.

Follow Us

Join the ARN newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Upcoming

Slideshows

In Pictures: Houston, we have a bug - 9 famous software glitches in space

In Pictures: Houston, we have a bug - 9 famous software glitches in space

There’s never a good time to run into software bugs, but some times are worse than others - like during a mission to space. Spacecraft of all shapes and sizes rely heavily on software to complete their objectives. But those missions can be quickly ended by the simplest of human errors when writing code. The omission of an overbar here or overflow error checking code there can mean the difference between success or failure, not to mention the loss of hundreds of millions of dollars, years of work and, on manned missions, human life. Use the arrows above to read about 9 examples that show that, despite the care with which these systems are built, bugs have occurred in spacecraft software since we started to fling rockets into space - and will, no doubt, continue to crop up.

In Pictures: Houston, we have a bug - 9 famous software glitches in space
IN PICTURES: Windows 10 Sydney launch

IN PICTURES: Windows 10 Sydney launch

Tech lovers and party-goers alike headed down to Mrs Macquarie's Chair to be part of the world-first Windows 10 Launch Party. The night featured a presentation by Microsoft Australia managing director, Pip Marlow, DJs, live demonstrations and digital artistry by Lister.

IN PICTURES: Windows 10 Sydney launch

iasset.com is a channel management ecosystem that automates all major aspects of the entire sales, marketing and service process, including data tracking, integrated learning, knowledge management and product lifecycle management.

Show Comments